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Spring on the York College campus

Resources for Sexual Violence

Here at York College of Pennsylvania, we believe that violence of any kind should not be tolerated.  There are resources available on and off campus for sexual assault, rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual harassment or stalking.  These types of violence can happen to any student regardless of factors such as race, gender, gender expression, sexual orientation, class or profession. We are dedicated to serving and supporting all victims without discrimination. YCP hopes to end sexual violence by providing resources to victims and preventative actions to help everyone change the culture. 

If you are a victim of violence we are here to support you. Here you’ll find important phone numbers, resources and warning signs, information about making a report, and access to the sexual misconduct policy. York College strives to protect all students from all forms of violence and encourages any student who is a survivor of an act of sexual and/or interpersonal misconduct to file an official report with Campus Safety immediately.

The creek running through the York College campus in the fall

  • If You Have Experienced...

    If You Have Experienced...

    Sexual Assault: An offense classified as a forcible or non-forcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In Pennsylvania, sexual assault is defined by Title 18 as a person engaging in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse with a reporting person without the reporting person’s consent.

    Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without consent of the victim. Rape also occurs when a person engages in sexual intercourse with a person by forcible compulsion or the threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable resolution, or when a person is unconscious or where the person knows that the victim is unaware that the act is occurring. This definition includes any gender of victim or perpetrator

    Dating Violence: Violence by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the length and type of relationship; and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Dating violence is currently not specifically defined by Pennsylvania State statute.

    Domestic Violence: A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies (under VAWA), or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction. Domestic Violence is currently not specifically defined by Pennsylvania state statute, however family abuse is. Abuse is defined as the occurrence of one or more of the following acts between family or household members, sexual or intimate partners or persons who share biological parenthood:

    1. Attempting to cause or intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causing bodily injury, serious bodily injury, rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, sexual assault, statutory sexual assault, aggravated indecent assault, indecent assault or incest with or without a deadly weapon.

    2. Placing another in reasonable fear of imminent serious bodily injury.

    3. The infliction of false imprisonment pursuant to 18 Pa.C.S. §2903 (relating to false imprisonment).

    4. Physically or sexually abusing minor children, including such terms as defined in Chapter 63 (relating to child protective services).

    5. Knowingly engaging in a course of conduct or repeatedly committing acts toward another person, including following the person, without proper authority, under circumstances which place the person in reasonable fear of bodily injury. The definition of this paragraph applies only to proceedings commenced under this title and is inapplicable to any criminal prosecutions commenced under Title 18 (relating to crimes and offenses).

    Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or to suffer substantial emotional distress. A person commits the crime of stalking when the person either:

    1. engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts toward another person, including following the person without proper authority, under circumstances which demonstrate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person; or

    2. engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly communicates to another person under circumstances which demonstrate or communicate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person.

  • Talking to Confidential Resources

    Talking to Confidential Resources

    If you are a victim of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, there are options for telling your story and receiving help.  These resources are not required to report any information and remain completely confidential.

    On Campus Resources

    Counseling Services: 717.815.6437 
    Health Services: 717.849.1615
    Spiritual Life: 717.815.1446

    Local Confidential Resources

    YWCA-ACCESS York & Victim Assistance Center: 717.846.5400, or 800.262.8444

    Additional Resources

    National RAINN Sexual Assault Hotline: 800.656.4673

    Immediate Medical Attention

    Get to a safe place, such as a Residence Assistant’s room, the Campus Safety office located in Manor NorthEast Lobby, or another safe place.

    If you are off campus and injured, call 911 for immediate help. If you are on campus and injured, you can call Campus Safety at 717.815.1314 for immediate help. Campus Safety will come to your aid and summon Metro emergency responders.

    If you have been the victim of non-consensual sexual intercourse, it is strongly recommended that you visit an emergency room within 24 hours for a “rape kit”, also know as a Sexual Assault Forensic Exam (S.AF.E.).  S.A.F.E. exams are conducted by specially trained forensic nurses, who can collect evidence, but also, and equally important, attend to your medical needs.  You do not have to report the crime, if you choose to have an exam. Evidence can be collected and stored for up to two years, giving victims time to consider their options. If possible, take a trusted friend or relative with you to the hospital to provide additional support. You may also call YWCA ACCESS York, Victim Assistance Center for hospital accompaniment.  A Victim Advocate will arrive at the hospital to help you understand the process and to provide additional support.  York Hospital is located at 1001 S George St, York, PA 17403 or you can call the main line at 717.846.5400.

    If you are able to, try to avoid activities that could potentially damage evidence such as:

    • Bathing
    • Showering
    • Using the restroom
    • Changing clothes
    • Combing hair
    • Cleaning up the area

    It’s natural to want to go through these motions after a traumatic experience. If you have done any of these activities, you can still have an exam performed. You may want to bring a spare change of clothes with you to the hospital or health facility where you’re going to have the exam.

    Get to a safe place, such as a Residence Assistant’s room, the Campus Safety office located in Manor NorthEast Lobby, or another safe place.

    If you are off campus and injured, call 911 for immediate help. If you are on campus and injured, you can call Campus Safety at 717.815.1314 for immediate help. Campus Safety will come to your aid and summon Metro emergency responders.

     
  • How to Report One of These Crimes

    How to Report One of These Crimes

    Immediate Contact Information for Resources

    Police Emergency: 911
    Spring Garden Township: 717.843.0851
    York City: 717.846.1234 

    YCP Campus Safety717.815.1314
    Located in Manor Northeast, Lobby 
    campussafety@ycp.edu 

    Hours:
    Summer: Office: Monday – Thursday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday: Closed 
    Campus Info Center: Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. 
    Fall/Spring: Office: Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: Closed 
    Campus Info Center: Monday – Sunday: 8 a.m. – Midnight 

    Title IX Coordinator
    Dr. Ken Martin
    Phone: 717.815.1548
    Office Location: Miller Administration Building, 2nd floor
    Email: kmartin@ycp.edu

    Deputy Title IX Coordinator
    Vicki Stewart
    vstewart@ycp.edu

    Immediate Medical Attention

    Get to a safe place, such as a Residence Assistant’s room, the Campus Safety office located in Manor East Lobby, or a trusted friend’s room or off-campus residence.

    If you are off campus and injured, call 911 for immediate help. If you are on campus and injured, you can call Campus Safety at 717.815.1314 for immediate help. Campus Safety will come to your aid and summon Metro emergency responders.

    If you have been the victim of non-consensual sexual intercourse, it is strongly recommended that you visit an emergency room within 24 hours for a “rape kit”, also know as a Sexual Assault Forensic Exam (S.AF.E.).  S.A.F.E. exams are conducted by specially trained forensic nurses, who can collect evidence, but also, and equally important, attend to your medical needs.  You do not have to report the crime if you choose to have an exam. Evidence can be collected and stored for up to two years, giving victims time to consider their options. If possible, take a trusted friend or relative with you to the hospital to provide additional support. You may also call YWCA ACCESS York, Victim Assistance Center for hospital accompaniment.  A Victim Advocate will arrive at the hospital to help you understand the process and to provide additional support.  York Hospital is located at 1001 S George St, York, PA 17403 or you can call the main line at 717.846-5400.

    If you are able to, try to avoid activities that could potentially damage evidence such as:

    • Bathing
    • Showering
    • Using the restroom
    • Changing clothes
    • Combing hair
    • Cleaning up the area

    It’s natural to want to go through these motions after a traumatic experience. If you have done any of these activities, you can still have an exam performed. You may want to bring a spare change of clothes with you to the hospital or health facility where you’re going to have the exam.

  • Sexual Misconduct Policy

    Sexual Misconduct Policy

    York College of Pennsylvania works diligently to create a safe and comfortable environment for all persons on campus. Unfortunately, acts of sexual and/or interpersonal misconduct could be committed by a member of our college community, including a YCP faculty or staff member, student, or outside person who comes onto campus. York College strives to protect all students from all forms of violence and encourage any student who is a survivor of an act of sexual and/or interpersonal misconduct to file an official report immediately.

    The York College of Pennsylvania Sexual and Interpersonal Misconduct Policy has been developed to ensure that consistent procedures and coordination of the College and community resources are available to students and employees affected by incidents of sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and other forms of interpersonal misconduct. The policies and definitions outlined are in compliance with the Higher Education Amendments of 1992 and 1998, The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, The Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (SAVE), and The Jeanne Clery Act. York College prohibits all acts of sexual and interpersonal misconduct including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The College strictly prohibits retaliation by its students, employees, faculty, staff, or agents, against a person who exercises his or her rights or responsibilities under any provisions of this policy. For students, any act of sexual or interpersonal misconduct is considered a serious violation of the College’s Student Code of Conduct. All expectations, procedures, and processes of the York College of Pennsylvania Sexual and Interpersonal Misconduct Policy will comply with Student Code of Conduct Disciplinary Process and Procedures. For employees, any act of sexual or interpersonal conduct is a serious violation of the Gender-Based Sexual Misconduct Policy.

    Frequently asked questions about the policy

    1. Will the responding person know my identity?
    Yes, if the college determines there is reasonable cause to believe a violation has occurred and investigates the matter. The responding party has the right to know the identity of the reporting party.

    2. Do I need to name the responding person?
    Yes, if you want formal disciplinary action to be taken against the responding party. You can report the incident without the identity of the responding party, but doing so may limit the college’s ability to respond comprehensively.

    3. Does information about the report remain private?
    The privacy of all parties is respected, except when it interferes with the college’s obligation to fully investigate allegations of sexual misconduct.

    4. How is a report of sexual misconduct decided?
    The college investigates allegations of sex/gender based harassment, discrimination or misconduct to determine whether there is evidence to indicate a policy violation is “more likely than not.” This standard, called the preponderance of the evidence, correspond to an amount of evidence indicating a policy violation is more than 50% likely to have occurred.

  • Warning Signs

    Warning Signs

    Warning Signs

    Relationship violence can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion or gender.

    It can happen to couples who are married, living together or who are dating. Relationship violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels.

    Abuse is a repetitive pattern of behaviors used to maintain power and control over an intimate partner. These are behaviors that physically harm, arouse fear, prevent a partner from doing what they wish or force them to behave in ways they do not want. Abuse includes the use of physical and sexual violence, threats and intimidation, emotional abuse and economic deprivation. Many of these different forms of abuse can be going on at any one time.

    You may be experiencing physical abuse if your partner has done or repeatedly does any of the following tactics of abuse:

    • Pulling your hair, punching, slapping, kicking, biting or choking you

    • Forbidding you from eating or sleeping

    • Damaging your property when they’re angry (throwing objects, punching walls, kicking doors, etc.)

    • Using weapons to threaten to hurt you, or actually hurting you with weapons

    • Trapping you in your home or keeps you from leaving

    • Preventing you from calling the police or seeking medical attention

    • Abandoning you in unfamiliar places

    • Driving recklessly or dangerously when you are in the car with them

    • Forcing you to use drugs or alcohol (especially if you’ve had a substance abuse problem in the past)

    You may be in an emotionally abusive relationship if your partner exerts control through:

    • Calling you names, insulting you or continually criticizing you

    • Refusing to trust you and acting jealous or possessive

    • Trying to isolate you from family or friends

    • Monitoring where you go, who you call and who you spend time with

    • Demanding to know where you are every minute

    • Punishing you by withholding affection

    • Threatening to hurt you, your family or your pets

    • Humiliating you in any way

    • Blaming you for the abuse

    • Accusing you of cheating and being often jealous of your outside relationships

    • Serially cheating on you and then blaming you for his or her behavior

    • Cheating on you intentionally to hurt you and then threatening to cheat again

    • Cheating to prove that they are more desired, worthy, etc. than you are

    • Attempting to control your appearance: what you wear, how much/little makeup you wear, etc.

    • Telling you that you will never find anyone better, or that you are lucky to be with a person like them

    How to get help:

    • Identify your partner’s use and level of force so that you can assess the risk of physical danger to you and others before it occurs.

    • If possible, have a phone accessible at all times and know what numbers to call for help. Know where the nearest public phone is located. Know the phone number to your local battered women’s shelter. If your safety is at risk, call the local police at 911, or if you are on campus, call Campus Safety at 717.815.1314.

    • Let trusted friends and neighbors know of your situation and develop a plan and visual signal for when you need help.

Contact Us
Liz Grubb, Coordinator of Sexual/Relationship Violence Prevention
Student Union, 318
Phone: 717.815.1215
egrubb@ycp.edu
Hours:
Summer Hours:
Monday - Thursday: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Friday: 8 - 11:30 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday: Closed

Fall/Spring Hours:
Monday - Friday: 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday: Closed

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